FLUENT

It is well documented that a proportion of children learning to read experiences persistent difficulties in the acquisition of automatic (fast and effortless) recognition of printed words, which in turn compromises their reading comprehension and makes reading unattractive. There is a scarcity of appropriate remediation methods; those that have shown to work (e.g., repeated reading of the same text) usually produce only modest gains and require sustained input from tutors, which is not always available.

Lifelong learning programme's Comenius multilateral project

Date

01/201103/2013. Project ended.

Funding

EU

Coordinating site

http://research.jyu.fi/fluent/

Partners

  • University College Cork (Ireland): Team members: Coordinator Marcin Szczerbinski, Joanna Piotrowska
  • University of Graz (Austria): Team members: Coordinator Karin Landerl, Stefanie Flizwisser, Stephanie Vitzthum, Kerstin Pratter,

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There is a scarcity of appropriate remediation methods; those that have shown to work (e.g., repeated reading of the same text) usually produce only modest gains and require sustained input from tutors, which is not always available. Training fluency through the use of computer game seems promising, since it can be attractive to children, requires relatively small input from tutors, and offers more natural opportunities for sustained practice than traditional tutor-led remediation methods.

The project will build on the expertise of University of Jyväskylä, which together with Niilo Mäki Institute has developed and evaluated GraphoGame Service. The Service includes a set of online games for helping children overcome difficulties in the initial phases of learning to read, which are now used widely across Finland.

The outputs will include:

  1. An expanded version of the Finnish GraphoGame into German, English and Polish versions that include reading accuracy and fluency training activities suitable for older (Grades 2-4) learners, and is accessible online free of charge;
  2. Evidence concerning the effectiveness and practical applicability of the game, collected through experimental studies and surveying the users (teachers and pupils);
  3. Dissemination of the recommendations on the most effective ways to use the game. The project is intended to make impact on the teaching practice of literacy, especially the practice of supporting children with specific reading difficulties (dyslexia).

Games and pedagogical recommendations developed during the project are meant to supplement traditional (tutor-led, small-group) remediation typically employed in this context.

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